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Is periodontal disease genetic?

January 15th, 2020

One of the most enjoyable parts of looking at family pictures is finding resemblances. You have your father’s brown eyes and your grandmother’s curly hair. You’ve got your aunt’s basketball height and your cousin’s freckles. But some similarities might not be so appealing—could one of those be a family tendency toward gum disease?

Studies have shown that periodontal disease appears to have some kind of genetic component, especially for serious diseases and those that appear early in the patient’s life. Aggressive periodontitis, for example, a relatively uncommon disease which causes rapid bone loss around certain teeth, is often more common among members of the same family. Other studies suggest there might be a genetic link between our immune response and the development of chronic periodontitis. So far, however, the link between genetics and gum disease is still under investigation.

We do know that environmental factors are an important trigger for gum disease. Failure to brush and floss, smoking, diet, stress, medical conditions such as diabetes—all can influence the health of our gums. The best way to overcome these factors is your own proactive approach! Thorough brushing and flossing, regular checkups and cleanings, proper nutrition, and avoiding smoking are all time-tested ways to keep your gums and teeth healthy. If you have a medical condition, proper treatment and medication will also help protect your oral health.

During your examination with Dr. K Cavallari at our Virginia Beach, VA office, please tell us about any family history of periodontal disease, your own gum care routine, and any habits or conditions which might influence your health. We can tailor treatment and offer suggestions for prevention based on a thorough knowledge of your medical history. We have many options available today for preventing and treating gum disease. Let’s make sure all your family albums are filled with beaming smiles—that’s the most appealing resemblance of all!

Restore Your Gums to a Healthier, More Natural State with Osseous Surgery

January 8th, 2020

Gum disease starts quietly and invisibly, but can lead to very serious and noticeable consequences if left untreated. Excess plaque and bacteria around the gum line cause irritation. This irritation can result in the gums pulling away from the teeth. When the gums pull away, they leave pockets between the gums and teeth which become home to more bacteria, leading to more irritation and infection. Gum pockets can get larger, resulting in more severe irritation and infection that can lead to bone loss around the tooth and eventually loss of the tooth itself.

The good news is that we can intervene at any of these stages to provide the periodontal care which will help restore your gums and teeth to health.  One of the procedures we use is osseous surgery. “Osseous” refers to bone tissue, and this treatment works to restore the bone structures supporting your teeth if gum disease has damaged or weakened them.

Healthy gums fit tightly around the teeth, keeping bacteria from affecting the roots and bone. Small pockets can be cleaned in our Virginia Beach, VA office and plaque removed from tooth areas normally hidden by the gums. But if the pocket has become too deep, normal home and even office cleanings cannot fully treat the gum and bone tissue involved. The bone which holds our teeth securely in our jaws can become pitted and irregular. Osseous surgery can be used not only to clean the area, but to restore gum and bone tissue to health.

After an anesthetic numbs the area, your periodontist will fold back the gum tissue around the affected tooth and bone. The gums will be carefully cleaned. If the bone has become pitted, this offers bacteria another place to grow and cause damage to your tooth structures. We will smooth damaged areas of the bone to their natural shape, where your gum tissue will find it easier to attach to the healthy bone. When we have finished, the gums will be secured around the tooth. After surgery, the pockets will be reduced in size, and you should be able to return to a normal routine of regular gum care.

We know the idea of oral surgery can be intimidating, so talk Dr. K Cavallari us about osseous surgery if it has been recommended for you. We are experienced in preventing gum disease from causing more damage, and in gently restoring your gums and bone to health for your most attractive and lasting smile.

New Year's Day Around the World

January 1st, 2020

New Year’s Day marks the beginning of the calendar year in most parts of the world. The holiday is celebrated on January 1st of each year. Customs and celebrations vary by country, religion, and even individual desires. Whether celebrated quietly or with gusto, the day brings the start of new opportunities for those that observe it.

United States and Canada

In both the US and Canada, celebrations begin on New Year’s Eve. At midnight on January 1st the New Year is welcomed with bells, horns, whistles, and other noisemakers. Fireworks are often part of the celebrations. In New York City, Times Square comes alive with revelers. In Toronto, there are large celebrations which may feature concerts, late-night partying, sporting events, and fireworks, with free public transit service during peak party times. Many individuals in North America greet the year by making resolutions for improvements in their lives.

China

In China, many people celebrate two forms of a new year. They may observe January 1st, but the traditional Chinese New Year is based on a lunar calendar. Parades with paper lanterns and dragons made from silk are a significant part of the festivities. Legends say that the dragon spends most of its time in hibernation so fireworks are used to keep the dragon awake.

Jewish Celebration

Jewish New Year’s observances begin with Rosh Hashanah, the first day of the New Year, and end with Yom Kippur, the Day of Atonement. This ten-day celebration is held in September or October, based on the Hebrew calendar. The New Year is not marked as much with loud celebrations as with personal insight to mend wrongs and resolve to better oneself.

Other countries and cultures also have different dates for New Year’s Day observances:

  • Vietnam observes the New Year in February
  • In Iran, the day is celebrated on March 21st
  • Islamic cultures often observe the tenth day of the month of Muharram
  • Russian Orthodox observers use the Julian calendar and celebrate on January 14th
  • Buddhist celebrations are held from April 13th through 15th

If you observe New Year’s Day by making healthy resolutions, include dental care in your plans with Dr. K Cavallari. The health of your teeth and gums contributes to your overall health. Caring for your mouth now can prevent many dental problems later in life. Dr. Kenneth J Cavallari, DDS wishes you a healthy, prosperous, and happy New Year!

Can surgery help my periodontal disease?

December 25th, 2019

If Dr. K Cavallari and our team have tried several different treatments without success such as antimicrobial therapy, tooth scaling, or root planing, but have been unsuccessful in curing or even stabilizing your periodontal disease, then surgery is most likely the next step.

Dr. K Cavallari will recommend surgery for the following three reasons:

  • Stop the gum disease from progressing
  • Repair the gums and periodontal tissue
  • Prevent further destruction of your periodontal issue in the future

Types of Gum Surgery

There are many types of gum surgery available at our Virginia Beach, VA office, including:

  • Gingivectomy – This is generally the first surgical intervention for periodontal disease. The procedure aims to extract diseased or infected gum tissue. It allows new tissue to grow and reattach itself to your teeth. Gingivectomy surgery can also be used to remove unnecessary gum tissue if you have a condition called gingival hyperplasia.
  • Gingivoplasty - This surgical procedure that is implemented for aesthetic reasons after a gingivectomy. It gives your gum tissue a natural look around your teeth. The procedure reshapes the areas of your gums that can look deformed after a soft tissue graft or a gingival curettage procedure.
  • Osseous (bone) Surgery – This type of surgery is often used in combination with a pocket depth decreasing procedure. This type of surgery is performed to correct malformations of the bones near your teeth. These pockets can provide an area for bacteria to hide and grow. The procedure evens out the shallow holes and asymmetrical surfaces of the damaged bone caused by bone loss because of the by periodontal disease.
  • Gum Graft – This type of surgery is performed to replace or reinforce the gingival tissue if you have bad gum recession. Gum grafts are used as a covering for teeth with exposed roots. The grafts also lessen the roots sensitivity and stops root cavities and gum recession.
  • Periodontal Flap Surgery & Pocket Depth Reduction – This surgery is considered the most significant gum surgery to cure your moderate to severe periodontal disease. Flap surgery reduces the depth of your periodontal pockets that can trap damaging dental plaque bacteria. By reducing the size of your periodontal pockets, less plaque bacteria and tartar can get in the pockets. This surgery also allows you to remove the plaque and tartar yourself using good oral hygiene.
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